Lekala pattern company update

There has been a lot of interest in the Lekala patterns, and I thought there were some key things I’m not sure I covered in my post about the Gridlock Lekala dress

  • The pattern is emailed to you after purchase as a PDF customised to your measurements
  • It’s dirt cheap (approx $2.50 a pattern)
  • The instructions appear to have been put through bing translate, and as such are amusing, but rather useless
  • Some patterns are very stylish, others aren’t to everyone’s taste
  • They don’t provide fabric recommendations consistently or requirements at all.  Even after download, until you lay out the pattern pieces you won’t know how much it will use
  • These aren’t suitable for complete beginners in my opinion, but if you have made something similar before and you are an advanced beginner you could be alright

Happy sewing!

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FO: Sewaholic Hollyburn skirt

Hooray for a sewalong!  Rachel at Mymessings is hosting a fabulous hollyburn sewalong, and as I need more work skirts, why not join in?
beginner sewing pattern sewaholic
Some fabulous pale blue eyelet was sitting at the op shop for a mere $4, and was just crying out to be a pretty new skirt. And then the ghosts of poor seamstresses threw all my plans into disarray. While untangling the eyelet to pre-wash it, it turns out someone had already cut this eyelet into strips, with the cuts going across the grain and each piece only 25″ narrow.  So narrow.  Too narrow for a hollyburn.  WHO WOULD DO THIS?

Woefully I dried it and packed it away into the stash.  There was no other hollyburn fabric in my stash (at least for a work skirt), so most tragically, I had to go fabric shopping.

Nipping into GJ’s fabrics in Brunswick yielded fantastic results, with two “wool blends” on the remnant table seeking a good home.  With kindness in my heart I adopted these blends for $27 for 4.5 metres.  Someone had to do it.

You know the really awesome thing?  Out of the 2.5m drapey soft wool blend fabric, I’ve managed to cut one hollyburn and two jenny skirts.  Ace right?
Hollyburn skirt front close up view

Fit

This skirt is easy to fit due to the style, and only the waistband is fitted.  It’s firm around the waist, and then skims over the hips.  I should have followed Rachel’s advice and maybe measured after a big meal, this is going to be a little tight if a pasta comes my way!

The pockets are the same style as the Cambie dress, so if you liked those, the hollyburn is a great skirt.  For this version I’ve gone for a unlined option, but I would consider next time make a fully lined hollyburn.

I cut view B, which was the mid-length option, which was a little long.  I realise there is a shorter length, but that had to much ‘flounce’ for my work (and gust of wind risk) for my purposes.  I’m close to the height sewaholic patterns are designed for, but I have a long torso and short legs.  Don’t be too jealous now.  All the skirts I’ve had to knock about 2″ off the hem, so this is going to become my standard sewaholic pattern adjustment.

hollyburn skirt back view

Fabric

I have no idea what is blended with this wool, but it’s lovely and soft and likes to disintegrate when you sew it.  I finished the seams with a line of stitching and then pinked the seam allowances, but you already can’t tell that I used pinking shears.  This skirt may fall apart while I wear it, but we’ll worry about that later right?  Perhaps some fraycheck might solve this problem.

As one hollyburn and two jenny skirts were cut from 2.5m, a few concessions had to be made.  Like the lining of the pocket.

Hollyburn skirt pocket details

I did commit to making my clothes with whimsy!  The pocket linings are from a fat quarter of fabric, which was $2 also from GJ’s discount fabrics.  The pale pink spots that no-one can see, are my way of resistance  like this skirt isn’t totally corporate and the man can’t keep me down.  Yeah, I’ll look professional, but BAM.  I HAVE CRAZY POCKETS.

Techniques

This is the perfect beginners skirt.  Four panels and a waistband, and between Tasia’s very straightforward instructions and Rachel’s comprehensive sewalong posts you really couldn’t go wrong.  If you’re considering learning to sew, although this has a zip in it, you can totally nail it.

Future lessons

This skirt really reinforced something for me, it’s faster to hand baste than sew and then rip out a seam.  I hand basted the waistband and then stitched in the ditch along the waist band, as this skirt is to be thrown in the washing machine in a rough fashion.

I don’t love this skirt just because it’s a tad boring, however boring is the go-to for work clothes,  After wearing this skirt all day, it drapes and moves in a very flattering way, and there really isn’t much to be done for that.   The details make it more fun for me, but I’d like to have another go at the hollyburn and use colour blocking.
Hollyburn skirt hanging

Does anyone have suggestions of how to make boring clothes more interesting?  I’m thinking solid colours but crazy design details.  Or will I be veering away from ‘classic’ pieces and into the territory of disposable fashion?

The postcards and patterns swap

Have you seen the fantastic idea from the perfect nose? It’s a patterns and postcards swap where you can (hopefully) have an exchange of patterns for something you will sew.

Anybody else a shocker for picking up sewing patterns on impulse? Just me? The patterns I’ve selected aren’t many (as I foolishly stick to the hope I will sew all my patterns – including the Disney princess ones), but they are pristine. Only one has been traced, which is the super cute kids pj set. All the others don’t look like they’ve been touched since the 1990’s.

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New look 6703 is gone!

The orange peplum top is gone!

If you’re interested in any of these patterns, please leave a comment below or email me at SarahPilling@sewsquirrel.com

The rules

List it: You have till the end of September 2012 to scan/ photograph everything you’d like to swap (might be a good idea to break it up into separate posts as all that scanning can get tedious after a while) and post it on your blog (if you have one) or as a Flickr/ Picassa set or Thinglink image.

Make it accessible: If you’re on Flick/ ThinkLink/ Picassa or any other image hosting site, check that you’ve set viewing access to be public so that everyone can see your swapfest goodies.

Claim it: A lot of people have expressed concerns about dibsies, so as of today there is is no official deadline for dibsies, if you like something, leave a comment/ send a message/ tweet/ email stating what you like with a link to the post/ picture set of stuff you’ve listed for swap so your swapee can choose something for themselves (and decide whether they want to swap).

Tag it: If something from your list has been spoken for, edit your post/ listing to mark it as taken (or delete it from the listing) so that you don’t get multiple dibs on the same item.

Mail it: It would be great to have things decided on and mailed by the end of October so recipients receive them early to mid November (which leaves everyone free for focusing solely on holiday/ family/ shopping stresses without having to worry about swaps etc).

Keep it social: Send your swap partner a quick email or blog comment as soon as you receive your parcel. Not only is this the polite (read, humane) thing to do, it’s great for senders to know that the goodies have arrived safely and aren’t languishing unclaimed in a customs hold up somewhere. And now on to the good stuff.